What We Do: 

No Collateral Bail Bonds Seminole County, Bail Bonds Service in Seminole County Sanford Florida and service in most counties in Florida since 1990. My Seminole County Bail Bonds Company and our Bail Bonds Agents are located directly across from the Seminole County Jail and have the ability to write bail bonds on any and all Felony bail bonds, Misdemeanor bail bonds and all criminal Traffic offences. We Specialize in Domestic Violence, DUI, all Drug and Theft charges, Warrants and Failure to Appears. Any amount large or small. Our Seminole County bail bonds service can now be completed with our new fast, simple and 100% secure online and Bail by Text Seminole County bail bonds service. We will guide you through the release process. Our Bail Bonds company will be with you throughout your case notifying you of all courtdates, times and locations. Call Our Sanford bail bondsman, Bail Bonds Service in Seminole and Volusai counties.

Proudly serving Central Florida Since 1990!

No Collateral Bail Bonds Company in Seminole County, Sanford Florida also Serving All Of Volusia County, Daytona Beach, Family Owned and Trusted Bail Bonds Company in Seminole County, Online or with our Bail Bonds by Text Service. Closest Bail Bonds to the Seminole County Jail Since 1990!

(407) 322- 4080   Text (407) 739-7505

At No Collateral Bail Bonds Seminole County, our owners and staff understand what a terrifying and confusing experience having a friend or loved one arrested can be. Our state licenced and very knowledgeable Seminole county bail bond agents will walk you through the process from start to finish. Our Promise: We will do our very best to have a loved one or friend released from the Seminole or Volusia County Jail as quickly and as painlessly as possible. After a person is arrested they are taken and booked into the Jail. The booking process will take a few hours once they are at the facility. After they are processed and the information is in the jails system we will let you know the charges, bail bonds amount and options you may have. Most criminal charges carry a preset bond amount. Certain offences do not have a bond as in the caes of Domestic Violence. On those cases the person within 24 Hours will go to a bond hearing at the jail also called initial appearance. Once agreed we will then go across the street and post bond. Once bond is posted at the facility it can take several hours to have them released from jail, depending on the time of day including shift change, feeding, head count or a number of other situations at the jail which we have no control over.

BAIL AND HOW IT WORKS

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Understanding How Bail Works – Frequently Asked Questions

How does the pretrial release process work?

When someone is arrested (in states that operate with commercial bail), a determination is made as to the type of pretrial release that will be considered based on the severity of the charge.  For low level offenses, defendants are often cited and released or released on their own recognizance.

For more serious charges, a bail amount is often set by an officer of the court using a bail schedule (a predetermined range of bail amounts by charge category) maintained by that jurisdiction.   Once a bail amount has been set, the defendant can now exercise his right to post bail.  Initial bond settings are often reviewed within a few days if the defendant has not posted bail.  Typically, the defendant enlists the help of family and friends to work with a 3rd party commercial bail agent to post their bond for a small fee (premium).  This additional layer of accountability ensures that the defendant will appear at all court proceedings and adhere to any other conditions set by the court.  Once the defendant appears at all court proceedings and the case has been adjudicated, the bond is then discharged by the court releasing the financial responsibility of the bail agency based on the completion of the case.

What are the different types of pretrial release mechanisms available to the defendant?

While pretrial processes differ slightly from state to state, there are generally 4 main types of pretrial release options:

Own Recognizance Release (OR) – if a defendant is not deemed a risk to the community or a flight risk, a judge may release that person on their own recognizance.  This type of release typically occurs with low level non-violent, first time offenders.  It means that they do not have to put up any money, but must simply promise to appear for all court appearances.

Pretrial Services Release – if a defendant is not deemed a serious risk to the community or a flight risk, but there may be other circumstances (substance abuse, mental health, etc.), a judge may release that person to a pretrial service agency.  This taxpayer funded agency is then responsible for ensuring that the defendant shows up for all court appearances.  Additionally, these agencies may also be responsible for ensuring that the defendant attend substance abuse classes or seek mental health assistance, etc.  In recent years, the expansion of state funded pretrial services often include onerous and restrictive “conditions” set by the court mirroring that of probationary conditions – all before any conviction at all.

Full Cash Release – if a defendant is deemed a risk to the community or a flight risk, and a judge/magistrate has set a bond using a bail schedule, the defendant can secure his release by paying the full amount of the bond to the court. This payment is a deposit to the court and will be refunded (less court costs and fees imposed by the judge) if the defendant appears for all court proceedings until final adjudication of the case, and once the bond has been exonerated by the court.  Most jurisdictions require an official filing by the party who made the deposit for release of the funds.

10% Bond Release – if a defendant is deemed a risk to the community or a flight risk, and a judge/magistrate has set a bond using a bail schedule, the defendant can secure his release by paying 10% of the amount of the bond amount directly to the court.  This payment is a deposit to the court and will be refunded (less court costs and fees imposed by the judge) if the defendant appears for all court proceedings until final adjudication of the case, and once the bond has been exonerated by the court. Should the defendant fail to appear for a required court appearance, the court will forfeit the balance of the amount of the bond, issue a warrant for the defendant’s arrest, and enter a default judgement against the defendant for the amount of the bond.

Bail Bond Release – if a defendant is deemed a risk to the community or a flight risk, and a judge/magistrate has set a bond using a bail schedule, the defendant can secure his release by paying the full amount of the bond to the court.  If the defendant does not have the full amount of the bond, they can use a third-party entity, in this case a state licensed and regulated bail bond agent, to post the bond for them.  This is typically done for a small fee or premium determined by the state, usually 10% or less of the bond amount (i.e., $1,000 bond would cost a defendant $100).  The premium paid to the bail bond agent is much like a premium fee paid on any insurance policy.  It is non-refundable and fully earned upon payment.  The bail agent, for the premium paid, plays an essential role to both the defendant and court by guaranteeing that the defendant shows up for court.  If the defendant fails to appear, the bail agent is responsible for either retrieving the defendant and bringing them back to court or paying the full amount of the bond to the court.

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